Video gives riders a safety lesson in braking

Published

Motorbike riders are encouraged to learn how to better protect themselves on the road by using anti-lock braking during Motorcycle Awareness Month this October.

Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Paul Toole said a new video released by Transport for NSW and the Motorcycle Council shows riders how the Anti-lock Braking Systems (ABS) safety feature works.

“We know motorcycle ABS can save lives but we also know many riders aren’t as familiar as they should be with how it works,” Mr Toole said.

“We developed this video with the Motorcycle Council of NSW to clearly explain how ABS works by preventing the wheels from locking up to give riders better control and to ensure this potentially life-saving technology doesn’t go to waste.”

Mr Toole said a study by Monash University showed ABS could reduce the rate of death and severe injury from motorcycle crashes by 39 per cent.

“So far this year 41 motorcyclists have been killed on NSW roads. One life lost on our roads is one too many, which is why the NSW Government is proud to be supporting Motorcycle Awareness Month and committed to reducing the number of motorcyclists killed on the roads.”

Motorcycle Council of NSW chairman Kevin Henry said the video would help prepare riders for the unfamiliar vibrations caused by ABS.

“The rider may feel a pulsing reverberate back through the brake lever and pedal when applied, but they just need to be aware of this sensation and continue to apply the brakes – it’s not a mechanical fault, it’s the ABS actively at work,” Mr Henry said.

“ABS has been mandatory on new models of motorcycles since 2019, and from November 2021 it will become mandatory for all new bikes, even older models still on the market.

“Riders are strongly encouraged to buy bikes fitted with ABS as it will significantly reduce your risk of a crash.”

While motorcycles only account for four per cent of registered vehicles, riders made up 19 per cent of fatalities last year, with 68 deaths, while another 2,207 were injured.

To see the video, visit ridetolive.nsw.gov.au/tips