Six iconic new modern ferries for Sydney Harbour

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Minister for Transport Gladys Berejiklian today announced the NSW Government is ordering six brand new modern ferries that will be some of…

Minister for Transport Gladys Berejiklian today announced the NSW Government is ordering six brand new modern ferries that will be some of the fastest in the fleet and have a similar look to the very popular First Fleet vessels on Sydney Harbour.

“The NSW Government is delivering new ferries as part of Sydney’s Ferry Future, our 20-year plan to modernise and expand Sydney’s ferry network,” Ms Berejiklian said.

“Labor slashed ferry services and failed to plan ahead and order new vessels, today we are getting on with the job of ensuring customers receive the world class service they deserve on Sydney Harbour.

“The new vessels will be some of the fastest on Sydney Harbour, and will be a modern version look and feel of the very popular First Fleet vessels that are loved by our customers, visitors and tourists.”

The concept design and specifications outlined in the tender were developed using feedback from customers, and expertise from the shipbuilding and maritime industries.

Tenders for the new inner harbour vessels open today and close in February 2015. Detailed design and construction of the new ferries will begin next year, with the first vessel to be on the water in 2016, Ms Berejiklian said.

“Each ferry will carry up to 400 passengers and some of the great new features include large outdoor viewing areas, around 90 more seats than the current First Fleet vessel, two wide walk-around decks, wi-fi access and real time journey information.”

The ferries will service all inner harbour routes, from Watsons Bay in the east to Cockatoo Island in the west, and will use new wharves such as Barangaroo which is expected to be completed in 2016. They will also be used to replace some older vessels in the fleet.

As part of the brand new Sydney Ferries fleet, the NSW Government is also continuing to look at options to service the Parramatta River, Ms Berejiklian said.